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What a delight fruit trees like apple, pear, cherry, and plum are to the beginning gardener. They come in all sizes and varieties and provide colorful blossoms in the spring and delicious fruits in the summer and fall.

The most important care you can give your fruit trees is an annual pruning. This will boost your harvest of top-notch fruit, keep your tree healthy, and manage its size. You’ll need a good set of hand clippers or “shears” and a set of long-handled “loppers” for higher branches. Your first pruning should come when you plant your bare-root fruit tree, most likely in the spring or the fall. After that, late winter is the best, when the tree is dormant and the leaves are gone so you can see where to cut. You should never prune in the spring, when the fruit tree is growing actively and its sap is running. You are likely to cause bleeding and open the tree to infections.

When pruning, you want to avoid flat cuts or the stubs will collect water and invite disease. Cut at a slant about one-quarter inch (a little under one centimeter) above a promising bud (that is, a bud that will produce a branch headed in the direction you want), a promising side branch, or a main branch.

When you are pruning your fruit trees, you are aiming for producing a tree in a spreading shape, without branches too close to the ground, and thinned so the sun can get through the leaves and ripen the fruit. For trees that bear heavy fruits like apples and pears, you want to encourage what is called a “central leader,” a strong middle branch from which other strong branches grow. Thin the branches along the center trunk by cutting right at the trunk so there’s plenty of space between them. Do the same for each secondary branch and so on until you get to the outermost branches. When choosing where to thin, look to cut away branches that are mostly vertical or too close to other established branches. For trees that bear lighter weight fruits, such as cherry and plums, prune for an open center. You want to encourage three or four branches along the lower part of the trunk spreading out to form a vase. The secondary branches can then be treated as they are in apple and pear trees. Whenever you’re doing your pruning to shape, also remove damaged wood back to a live branch, take off a few older limbs before they become too big, and cut off branches that have crossed and might rub.

The one exception to the rule about pruning only in the colder months is the case of suckers. These are fast-growing shoots that grow along the roots of a fruit tree. These will not grow into healthy fruit trees but will compete for resources with your tree. Suckers should be treated as weeds and lopped off at the base or mowed over as soon as they appear.

Pruning your fruit trees once a year is an easy chore that will keep your trees blooming and attractive and help ensure a robust crop.

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Tips on Using Lemon Juice as a Beauty Aid

by Rumee Roy

The juice of the humble lemon can be an inexpensive and effective beauty aid if used regularly and in the right way. Lemon juice contains citric acid, which is responsible for its sour taste and the kick to our taste buds when we have lemonade or lemon meringue pie. It also has a mild lightening effect on the skin. Lemon juice is rich in many minerals and vitamins, and especially in vitamin C. If you wish to extract the most out of this power-packed fruit as a natural, chemical-free beauty aid, the following advice can provide guidance.

Drink lemon juice in warm water

Squeeze half a lemon and mix the juice in a glass of warm water. Drink it on an empty stomach first thing in the morning. The vitamin C content in lemon juice is good for your skin, as it acts as an antioxidant which helps to repair skin damage caused by free radicals. Use warm rather than cold water to aid in absorption within the body. Remember to drink plain water or rinse your mouth after drinking the lemon juice to prevent the acid from remaining on your teeth.

Apply lemon juice on the face

Lemon juice, when applied on facial skin has many benefits. The acid in lemon juice helps to lighten spots or pigmentation with daily use. Mature or dry skin will benefit more if the juice is mixed in a small amount of olive oil before application. This mixture can help reduce wrinkles and improve skin tone. Follow up with a moisturizer after this treatment if you have dry skin, as lemon juice can have a drying effect on the skin

Use as a scrub on knees and elbows

Mix 1 tablespoon of olive oil with about 2 tablespoons of lemon juice, and add 6 tablespoons of common salt. Rub the mixture into rough or calloused areas of knees and elbows. Wash off after half an hour. Frequent use will smooth rough patches and lighten dark areas.

Use as a hair rinse

If you want shiny, bouncy hair, mix the juice of a lemon in a glass of water. Use this as a rinse after shampooing your hair in the usual way. Be sure to massage it in, carefully coating all strands of hair, and then rinse after about 10 minutes. This treatment is great for ensuring a glamorous head of hair for an evening out. It also helps in reducing dandruff and grease in hair, if used at least twice a week on an on-going basis.

The key to reaping visible benefits from using lemon as a beauty aid lies in regularity. Go ahead and experiment to see what works for you. Use this inexpensive but potent fruit to enhance your beauty quotient!


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