Print Friendly, PDF & Email

No matter what type of animals you have, you will eventually have an emergency involving them. It is just the way it goes when raising livestock or pets. Prevention may be the key, but being prepared is an even better motto.

It is impossible to be prepared for every single situation that could happen. It is also difficult to keep medicines and preventatives supplied for every type of animal you may have. Stock up on some of these first aid essentials and create a basic emergency kit for your barn, car, or wherever your animals may be. Some of the ingredients are human-friendly as well. Our list will help you cover the basics and you can then fill in with species-specific items as you see fit.

Antiseptics, Anti-Pain, Anti-Everythings

Antibiotic ointment
Antibiotics – oral, injectable, spray
Antiseptic/antibacterial hand gel
Antiseptic scrub, spray, wipes
Aspirin – (NEVER give to cats)
Baking soda – helpful for bloating issues
Blood-clotting wound powder
Cold compresses – instant and soakable
Epsom salts
Eye ointment – nonsteroidal
Hydrogen peroxide
Iodine
Isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol)
Pepto
Petroleum jelly
Sterile saline solution – for washing out eyes and wounds
Must-Haves (Even in non-emergencies)
Baling twine – it used to be baling wire, but twine works in a pinch
Blankets
Clippers – manual and electric
Dental floss – plain and waxed
Duct tape – no explanation needed
Flashlight (with extra batteries)
Emergency contact list
Gloves – disposables (latex and non-latex) and regular, heavy gloves
Pocket knife
Restraints – hobbles, cross-ties, extra halters, collars, ropes, leads, etc.
Sewing needles – suture needles preferred, but upholstery needles will suffice
Sewing threads (cotton and polyester)
Toenail clippers – hoof nippers
Towels
Veterinarian’s phone numbers
Wire cutters
Soft Supplies
Adhesive tape – various strengths and widths
Adhesive bandages
Clean rags and towels
Cotton bandages
Cotton batting
Elastic bandaging (commonly known as vet-wrap)
Gauze pads and rolls
Rolled bandages or “polo” wraps
Sponges – various types and materials

Tools

Disposable razors
First Aid Manual for animals
Magnifying glass
Measuring spoons and cups
Needles for syringes
Oral thermometer
Rectal thermometer – you should always have a string firmly attached to the end
Scalpels
Scissors – safety for cutting bandages, regular sharps for cutting everything else
Stethoscope
Syringes – both oral and injectables
Tweezers

This list is by no means all-inclusive but it should help you to get an idea of the types of supplies and tools you might keep on hand. Creating and maintaining an emergency kit doesn’t have to be expensive or labor intensive. Many of the items can be found in both brand name and generic versions at your local discount stores for under a dollar.

One thing to note is that while most of the things listed above are safe to use on almost every type of animal, there are exceptions (such as no aspirin for cats). Be sure that any medicine or treatment you are using is labeled safe and approved for that particular species. You don’t want to inadvertently make the situation worse. Also keep in mind that some popular products are not recommended for egg, meat, or milk-producing animals.

Feel free to add anything to your own kit that you feel could be of use during an emergency. It is not uncommon to have a separate small box or kit for each species while keeping a “master kit” of the basics. Everyone’s situation is different, so please let us know what you would include in your own barn emergency kits. We can all learn from each other and keep our animals safer.

By Julie Dees

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of



Oh, we are all about…




Small Ways To Be Frugal

It really isn’t all that hard to figure out how to save money around the house. Small changes here and there (with just a few large changes) can add up to real savings. Save some cash in the bank by fitting in these easy money-saving ways.

Do It Yourself

Paying others to do jobs around the house constitutes a large chunk of the money spent in renovating your home. Doing these jobs yourself, from minor repairs to installing windows is a great way of saving money. There are some jobs that might require some skill, but you can save a considerable amount of money. For the budding do-it-yourself enthusiast, the Internet is a fantastic place to find a lot of resources. You could also get some books from the library. If the project is going to be complicated, then attend a workshop at a home improvement store or at a local education center. The cost of attending the workshop is small and adds to the savings in the long run.

Maintenance

Learn how to change your heater and air-conditioner filters. Clean out the gutters in the spring. Replace shower heads and faucets. Change the air and oil filters in your car regularly.

Repair – Don’t Replace

The tendency for most people is to throw away things that break. But instead of immediately throwing out the broken item, try practicing frugal living by attempting to repair the item. For instance, a small sewing kit can be used to repair lost button on clothing, torn knees and ripped hems. A few nails and some wood glue can take care of a broken chair leg. If the item that is broken is something that you yourself cannot repair, find out if your neighbor or a friend has the necessary skills to fix it.

Repay the labor with another service that you can do

For example, you can offer to do several hours of babysitting in exchange for fixing your car by a mechanically-inclined friend. It’s a win-win for both of you.

Figure out what you can do without

You can, of course, simply try to live without something that costs too much money. The idea may seem a little odd at first, but you will find that there are many items you think are “necessary” but later on find that you can live without it.

Combine the ride

Your car is usually the second most expensive item aside from the house. Some families have found that sharing car rides with a neighbor is a great way to save money, and there is less maintenance to keep up with.

Move to a smaller home

Just because you can afford it, does not mean you have to spend all your money on a large house. This doesn’t mean frugal living equals living in a small closet, just that a larger house may not be necessary. If you’re renting, take into account the cost of insurance and maintenance when buying your first home. Make sure it’s a sound investment first, and whether you’ll be able to continue saving money even after the bills are paid.

Dine out less, eat at home more

You have probably heard of this one before, but maybe you don’t realize how expensive it really is to eat out all the time. Think about it, the average salad (even at a fast food restaurant) costs about $5, but the average bag of salad at the grocery store is $2.50. Grow your own? Now we’re talking pennies. So really consider this one carefully. A simple home-cooked meal is easy and way cheaper.

Go ahead, change the way you think about living a more frugal lifestyle. Then let the savings begin!


Picked For You

  • Dexter Cattle: Are They the Perfect Cow for the Small Farm or Homestead?Dexter Cattle: Are They the Perfect Cow for the Small Farm or Homestead?
    The farm I grew up on was in Upstate New York. We primarily raised Morgan horses, but Dad always had plenty of other critters around, too. I still remember the first cow he brought home. Her name was Daisy, and she was a Charolais. That cow would just walk through fences like they weren’t even …