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With winter chills officially in the air, many of us are reaching for clothes that we haven’t seen since spring. Unless you have an enormous closet, you probably need to do some re-organizing around this time, rotating your seasonal clothes into and out of storage. Out come the jackets and scarves, and away go the summer hats and maxi dresses.

Transitioning your closet from summer to winter can be overwhelming, but there are a few simple steps that you can take to ensure that you’re taking good care of all your clothes.

For Clothes You’re Putting Into Storage
  • Clean your clothes before you store them. Wash or dry clean each item one last time before it goes away. If any grime, mildew, stains, or other ickiness is on your clothes now, it’ll be twice as hard to remove after sitting there for several months.
  • Take this time to purge. Take note of the items that you didn’t wear all summer. This is a great opportunity to make a “donate” pile and drive it to the local thrift store.
  • Choose the right containers. Stow your summer clothes in air-tight plastic containers with a lid. Avoid plastic dry cleaner bags, which trap moisture and suffocate your clothes, or cardboard boxes, which attract insects. Vacuum-seal bags work, but will wrinkle your clothes.
  • Pack properly. There’s a “right” way to pack every item. Shirts, dresses, and other flexible items should be rolled up, rather than folded, so they take up less room. For clothes that should stay hanging, use a rolling garment rack. Hats can be placed in a hat box or regular plastic bin; stuff them to maintain the shape and don’t place anything heavy on top.
  • Don’t put everything away. Only store items that are truly limited to one season, like shorts and sandals. Other items, like short-sleeved T-shirts, can be useful all year long.
  • Add a pest-repelling sachet. A sachet full of lavender or cedar will discourage pests and also make your clothes smell great through the winter. Don’t forget to replace it occasionally!
For Clothes You’re Taking Out From Storage
  • Organize as you go. Transitioning a closet can be daunting, and it’s tempting to take shortcuts and just kind of toss everything in. But truthfully, this is the perfect time to organize, since you have to go through each item anyway. Sort similar pieces together – sweaters in one place, jackets in another, and so on. It makes everything much easier later.
  • Inspect your clothes for damage. Did moths get to your sweaters? Are your boots intact? Take a look at each piece as well as the storage containers. Even if there aren’t any holes in your clothes, moths leave behind other evidence, like casings or cocoons.
  • Get rid of musty smells. Depending on your summer storage situation, your clothes may develop a musty smell after a few months despite your best efforts. To get rid of the smell, mist them with a mixture of one part vodka and two parts water. If that fails, consider the dry cleaner.
  • Refresh down coats. To help puffy coats regain their natural, full shape, toss them into the dryer with a few tennis balls or hang them in the bathroom during a hot shower.

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Fixes: Protecting Your Crops from Seasonal Frost and Freeze

Frost and freeze can cause terrible damage to your crops, not to mention it has you feeling anxious about your crops the entire night. Luckily, there’s a way to protect your crops from falling victim to frost or freeze, but first, we’ll have a lesson in what these phenomena are in the first place.

Frost and Freeze

Freeze is what happens when the temperature in the environment is below water’s freezing point, which is 32 o F. Obviously, the water inside your crops and plants has the same freezing point, and so it freezes, causing the cells to burst. This leads to severe plant damage that can’t be fixed.

Frost, on the other hand, occurs at a temperature that’s below freezing. The temperature of your crops reaches the freezing point, even if the temperature that surrounds your crops is approaching 32 o F. Since the surface of your plant crops is already at the freezing point, then any dew that forms will automatically turn into ice, causing distress to the plant. You may have seen frost in the form of hoarfrost, the feathery shape of crystals that cover your plants, and rime, which is what happens when dew from the plants turns into frost upon being released.

How To Protect Your Crops

You’ll need some mulch (make sure it’s organic), a mallet, row covers or sheets, wooden stakes and some containers of various sizes. An integral part of farming is not just taking effective measures when the temperatures go down, but predicting such conditions beforehand. Check a weather forecast for low nighttime temperatures and water your crops adequately a few days before the frost is expected to occur.

Your crops will be less susceptible to harm from the cold if they’re well-watered and aren’t wilting. Since your soil will be nice and moist, your crops will stay well protected too. Spread your choice of organic variety mulch in a thick layer over the soil in case there isn’t any mulch placed already. If you’re trying to protect young plant crops from the frost, you can cover them with layers of light hay or mulch.

Take your wooden stakes and place them into the soil while making sure that the tops of plants fall below the tips of the stakes. Use row covers or sheets to place them over the crops and wooden stakes but remember that your sheets shouldn’t touch the plants. Bring the sheets to the soil level and cover them with more soil to keep them from lifting and allowing the chill to enter. If you have smaller crops lying around individually, cover them with a container but place a small dish with water inside so that heat is provided.

If you want, you can set up some lights (like fairy lights) under the protective sheets so they give off some heat to your crops. The next morning, you should remember to remove the row covers, sheets and containers from plants. That’s because sunshine will kick in soon, and leaving the covers on your crops would put them at the risk of overheating.

Practice this effective routine every time you’re anticipating the frost to keep your crops protected. Happy Farming!


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