Print Friendly, PDF & Email

We love growing and cultivating plants. Trees, flowers, shrubs, fruits, vegetables, on a large farm, in the backyard, and even on the apartment balcony. And we should be aware of the health benefits of such activities.

Exercise

Gardeners are actually exercising, like running, swimming or going to the gym. Access to fresh air enables the blood to flow freely, you burn more calories helping you to keep fit, reducing the risk of high blood pressure, stroke or heart attack.

Energy and Strength

Women who farm can endure more since farm work involves stretching, lifting and carrying heavy materials. Just pushing a wheelbarrow can strengthen your muscles and bones. Engaging in challenging activities really isn’t a challenge at all… you’re just stronger and can do a whole lot more.

Reduced Stress

Gardeners have proven to recover from stress and depression quicker since the levels of cortisol and stress hormones is drastically reduced while working in the garden. Research by CNN shows that when stressed, spending time in the garden drastically improves your mood than if you stayed indoors.

Proper Nutrition

Women farmers grow their own food; this food is fresh and has more nutritional benefits. Most of the time these plants are not sprayed, compared to food bought at the market and grown commercially. Research shows that gardeners eat more fruit and vegetables than the average person, building up immunity to illnesses. And the time spent out in the sun is your best source for vitamin D.

Better Relationships

The sense of care and goodwill helps women have a better and healthier relationship with other people. We spend much of our time taking care of everyone, it’s just how we’re built. Feeding our family and friends food grown on the farm is the ultimate expression of love. And the people in our lives know that, strengthening those bonds.

Tips for enhancing your gardening activities:

  • Raised beds can help reduce the risk of joint and back pain because you’ll be avoiding a lot of bending while planting, weeding or harvesting.
  • Always choose the right tools with the right weight for you. Heavy gardening tools can actually cause overexertion and swelling.
  • Take time to rest and relax every night. Don’t overdo it, you’ll strain both the mind and body which can have an effect on you, not just physically, but mentally too.
  • Chemicals not only destroy microorganisms in the soil necessary for plant growth but using it is harmful to our bodies. Try to find a natural alternative first and stay healthy.

 
Remember to think of gardening as a way to stay fit, mentally and physically. It really is a healthier way to live.

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of



Oh, we are all about…

  • Cheer Up KitCheer Up Kit
    by Dee Dee Know somebody who is feeling a little …



Winter Gardening: Pruning Your Fruit Trees

What a delight fruit trees like apple, pear, cherry, and plum are to the beginning gardener. They come in all sizes and varieties and provide colorful blossoms in the spring and delicious fruits in the summer and fall.

The most important care you can give your fruit trees is an annual pruning. This will boost your harvest of top-notch fruit, keep your tree healthy, and manage its size. You’ll need a good set of hand clippers or “shears” and a set of long-handled “loppers” for higher branches. Your first pruning should come when you plant your bare-root fruit tree, most likely in the spring or the fall. After that, late winter is the best, when the tree is dormant and the leaves are gone so you can see where to cut. You should never prune in the spring, when the fruit tree is growing actively and its sap is running. You are likely to cause bleeding and open the tree to infections.

When pruning, you want to avoid flat cuts or the stubs will collect water and invite disease. Cut at a slant about one-quarter inch (a little under one centimeter) above a promising bud (that is, a bud that will produce a branch headed in the direction you want), a promising side branch, or a main branch.

When you are pruning your fruit trees, you are aiming for producing a tree in a spreading shape, without branches too close to the ground, and thinned so the sun can get through the leaves and ripen the fruit. For trees that bear heavy fruits like apples and pears, you want to encourage what is called a “central leader,” a strong middle branch from which other strong branches grow. Thin the branches along the center trunk by cutting right at the trunk so there’s plenty of space between them. Do the same for each secondary branch and so on until you get to the outermost branches. When choosing where to thin, look to cut away branches that are mostly vertical or too close to other established branches. For trees that bear lighter weight fruits, such as cherry and plums, prune for an open center. You want to encourage three or four branches along the lower part of the trunk spreading out to form a vase. The secondary branches can then be treated as they are in apple and pear trees. Whenever you’re doing your pruning to shape, also remove damaged wood back to a live branch, take off a few older limbs before they become too big, and cut off branches that have crossed and might rub.

The one exception to the rule about pruning only in the colder months is the case of suckers. These are fast-growing shoots that grow along the roots of a fruit tree. These will not grow into healthy fruit trees but will compete for resources with your tree. Suckers should be treated as weeds and lopped off at the base or mowed over as soon as they appear.

Pruning your fruit trees once a year is an easy chore that will keep your trees blooming and attractive and help ensure a robust crop.


Picked For You

  • Identifying Disease in Your Vegetable GardenIdentifying Disease in Your Vegetable Garden
    Diseases in your vegetable or plant garden are often caused by harmful fungi or viruses that suck up nutrients and affect surrounding crops. Some of the most common causes of crop disease include a lack of airflow, improper drainage of the soil and weather that increases atmospheric moisture. Since prevention is always better than cure, …