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Modern medical science can work wonders for health and beauty, but oftentimes the old ways still have plenty to offer. As more and more people become suspicious about the chemical nasties poured into beauty products, they’re turning to treatments with deep roots in the past.

Jojoba oil is one of these natural remedies. It comes from a plant that grows natively in the lands where California, Arizona, and Mexico meet, and has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years to improve skin and hair health. What could this all-natural oil do for you?

Makeup Remover

Makeup may make you feel more attractive and confident, but it’s punishing on your skin. This is especially true if you use harsh chemical makeup removers every day. Using jojoba oil avoids that. It’s a natural cleanser and clears all traces of cosmetics without any irritation or damage.

Simply add a few drops of oil onto a cotton ball and gently rub off your makeup with small circular motions. When you’re done, the jojoba oil traces can be wiped off with a fresh cotton ball dampened with warm water.

Hair Color Protection

If you use coloring on your hair, massage in a little jojoba oil after your shower. This will help to preserve its tint, reducing the fading effects of strong sunlight or swimming pools treated with chlorine.

Dandruff Protection

Massaging jojoba into your scalp will help keep it supple and elastic, reducing the dryness and flakiness that leads to dandruff. What’s more, the gentle cleansing and antiseptic actions will help keep your hair follicles strong for full, shiny, healthy hair.

Reduces Wrinkles

Jojoba oil is packed with two vitamins, E and B complex, both of which act as powerful antioxidants. This means they work to repair the skin cell damage caused by sunlight, pollution, and the passing years.

When you apply jojoba oil to your skin, the vitamins help strengthen the epidermis, speed up cell regeneration, and improve elasticity. All of this helps to ward off wrinkles and maintain a smoother, more youthful-looking skin.

Softens Chapped Skin

If you have a problem area of chapped skin on your hands, neck, or feet, jojoba oil will soften and strengthen the skin quickly and effectively. Simply massage it in generously, and leave for an hour before rinsing with warm water. Repeat every second day until you see the desired results.

Fights Fungal Infections

The oil also boasts antifungal and anti-inflammatory agents. These can reduce acne breakouts, minimize warts, treat athlete’s foot, and also help heal fungal nail infections.

Full-Body Hydration

Massaging jojoba oil into your skin before or after bathing will help it retain moisture far better than any expensive skin cream. What’s more, its non-greasy texture and appealing smell will leave you feeling totally clean and fresh.

If the beauty shelves of your local health store are filled with chemical-based products, you may wonder about the long-term effects of using them too often. If you’d like to take a more traditional approach, jojoba oil makes an ideal choice. It’s totally natural, easily available, free from side effects, and can provide remarkably good benefits for your skin and hair.

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Great Herbs To Grow For The Beginner

If you’ve ever felt the rush of fulfillment when you cook using your own vegetables, wait till you try garnishing your meals with home-grown herbs.

Herbs are a great way to add flavor and an appetizing aroma to your meals but the high price of them on the market makes them seem like they’re not really a necessity. Luckily, with a little effort, you can start growing herbs on your own.

Since herbs are fairly small, it’ll be better to start growing them out of pots so you can manage them easily. Fertilizer is important for when you’re growing them and it can help retain nutritional balance in your soil which can grow healthy herbs.

To know if your soil is lacking any essential minerals, you can collect samples and have it tested. The test will determine what nutrients it contains, and what it doesn’t so you can get the right fertilizer. Remember to use an organic fertilizer that won’t cause any damage to your plants’ or your health.

Once you’ve prepped your soil, you’re ready to put it into pots and begin growing, but you need to pick which herbs you want to grow.

Two factors will determine what herbs you should grow; how easy it is to grow a certain herb and what your personal preferences are. (Of course, you’ll want to grow herbs that you actually intend to use.) For convenience, I’ll be naming herbs that you can find in almost every kitchen.

Parsley

You can grow this versatile herb by sowing them in warm soil. The soil can be either in a pot on a window or in a bed when the soil feels warm. These seeds can take some time to finally germinate so you can speed it up a notch by putting them in water and leaving them overnight before you plant them. Grow them in damp soil and place the pot in a sunny place.

Rosemary

This is the ultimate beginner’s herb because of how simple it is to grow, not to mention how good it tastes. Since it grows with hard leaves, it doesn’t lose water too quickly, which means you shouldn’t keep the soil too moist either.

Other than that, the soil doesn’t need much prepping and you don’t need to make special arrangements with regards to sun or shade, because rosemary isn’t picky.

Oregano

If cooking Italian is your specialty, then you need an Oregano plant right away. This delicious herb prefers light and warm soil, as well as lots of sunshine.

Sow them in a pot with warm soil, and pinch out the parts which grow vertically when the shoot has a height of 10 centimeters because it helps in stimulating growth.

Coriander

This herb is fairly popular in Asian cuisine and now you can grow it at home in pots. The seeds will take a few weeks until they germinate while the plants don’t last very long, so you’ll need to add more seeds often so you have a consistent supply. If you want the best-tasting coriander, then keep your plants healthy and harvest it often.


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