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As evidenced by the storyline of Confessions of a Shopaholic, a scarf can be a defining accessory. Just as the young heroine in the story imagined, her dreams came true as a result of one striking green scarf, though not quite as she had pictured it. What dreams might come true for every woman if she allowed herself the purchase of one beautiful, defining scarf?

Scarves have been a hot fashion trend for several years now, and there are no signs of scarves becoming passé. The scarf has always been a classic, elegant accessory, but it can also promote a casual, quirky look, depending on the style, material, and pattern of the scarf. Scarves are an especially hot trend among teens and young women.

The popularity of the scarf is perhaps due to the fact that it is no longer a cooler-weather-only accessory. Sheer, airy scarves are light enough for the warm months, especially on a mild summer night. While short neck scarves were trendy in the 50s and 60s (picture Jackie Kennedy/Onassis), today’s summer trends include the longer scarves as well.

The scarf’s ability to punch up any simple ensemble is only one of its beauties. You can wear a scarf with a solid shift, a t-shirt and jeans, or a tank top and flirty skirt. Choose a scarf to soften or brighten a dress or outfit that would otherwise not look right on you. Fashion experts recommend you try one around your waist, and some have experimented with tying one (or two) small scarves around their wrist, like a pseudo-bangle.

Why risk feeling overheated by adding a summer scarf? Because it is transferable. Choose the right material and you’ll go from cool air conditioning to summer heat without breaking a sweat. Wear it like a bandana in a convertible to keep your hair from whipping in your face, or drape it around your shoulders in the chilly blast of a/c overload. Wear it loosely draped around your neck with the ends hanging down in warmer temps, or wrap it around your waist when the temps start to sizzle.

The best thing about scarves? They make everyone – of every shape and size – look fabulous. A scarf attracts the eye to the neck and enhances the face. A long, thin scarf worn loosely draped and hanging down adds length to your body. When it trails behind you in the breeze it simulates long hair, a decidedly feminine touch. But the scarf isn’t just feminine (men are wearing them, too); a scarf can be funky or Goth.

Try these options for wearing a scarf:

  • Tie the scarf at the neck and let the ends hang down in front, on the side, or draping down your back. This is a great look for formal outfits and the LBD (little black dress).
  • Wear it open with the ends hanging down your front. Wear this look with casual, flowy clothing or to dress up a blazer.
  • Tie a gauzy, long & thin scarf once just above or below your chest. It’s perfect for tank tops paired with jewelry.
  • Fold a square scarf in half to form a triangle, then tie the very end points behind your neck. Let the shorter point drape in front, or slightly off-center.
  • Fold any long scarf in half length-wise, then put it around your neck with a loop on one side and the ends on the other. Pull the ends through the loop, then pull it until the slip-knot you’ve made is resting near your throat, or wear it more loosely.
  • Wrap a long, thin scarf twice around your neck, then tie it in a knot about three inches below your throat.

Cashmere, lace, silk, organic cotton – drape yourself in a touch of luxury with one or two definable scarves. It’s the easiest and the least expensive way to add style and interest to your wardrobe.

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Critter Control: Tips To Keep Your Home Safe This Winter

If the sound of tiny footsteps is keeping you awake at night, your home might have a few unwanted guests. From mice to squirrels and bats to pigeons, wild animals need to find a warm place to call home so they can survive the harshness of winter weather. You can use the following tips to keep your house free of uninvited furry and feathered creatures.

Close Up Openings

Don’t make it easy for wildlife to enter your home. Now is the time to seal window openings and board up attic vents with sturdy screening. Take a walk around your home and outbuildings o identify any problems, make a list, and gather the supplies you need before you begin to remedy these problems. Even if you aren’t actively using a chimney or dryer vent, you might want to consider having a screen placed over top of it to prevent wild birds and animals from entering your home through it.

Secure Your Gutters

Weak spots in your gutters could be an indication of a larger problem. It is possible that water damage is loosening the gutter, causing it to pull away from your home. If this is the case, you might also have structural damage in the walls or roof. Take the time to investigate the situation and make any repairs that are necessary.

Remove Debris

Wildlife typically looks for quiet, uninhabited spots to call home, which is why they burrow beneath your porch, climb into your attic, or tunnel underneath a shed. If you want to keep them out, you need to eliminate anything that might make these places more attractive to animals. Clean up yard debris and unwanted items several times a year to discourage wildlife pests from moving ono your property.

Clean Up after Your Pets Promptly

If you have pets, you should clean up after they are finished eating to avoid tempting other animals to enjoy their leftovers. Some animals store their food for months before eating it. Even if they aren’t hungry, they might just as easily decide to gather dry dog or cat food for storage.

Wild animals can do a lot of damage to a home, while also causing sleepless nights or bring infectious diseases into your home. Even if your home hasn’t been entered yet by these pests, you might want to consider bringing in a wildlife control specialist to help secure your home against future invasions. Keep your house a home instead of a wildlife refuge.


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