Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Whether a rancher, a vegetable farmer, a farmer florist, or home gardener, growers of all sorts can empathize with one another at the height of long days and overflowing harvests known as “peak season.” From sunrise to sunset, many farmers take advantage of the extra daylight, necessarily so, as everything is in full bloom, leaving most on their feet for some 10-12 hours (or more!) every day. Yet, while the plants have got us workin’ overtime, we’ve got to remember to take care of ourselves if we have any hope of continuing our work season after season. And, there’s no better place to start than our bodies’ foundation–the feet!

Extended time on foot can leave one feeling more than just achy–tight, dry skin, swollen ankles, and much more. Keep your forgotten feet feeling fresh each night by trying out a few of these recommendations.

Foot Soak

Foot soaks don’t have to be fancy. In fact, water alone will do wonders. The trick is utilizing both hot and cold water foot baths in an alternating sequence. Fill two foot tubs with water; one with water as hot as you can handle, the other with cold water–maybe even a few ice cubes.

Start by soaking your feet in the hot water for 5-10 minutes. After the time is up, switch to the cold soak for 3-5 minutes, and then back to the hot soak. Repeat this sequence for up to 30 minutes. The alternating between hot and cold water allows for contraction and expansion of the blood vessels in the feet, ankles, and calves which essentially reduces inflammation and pain while increasing circulation and flexibility. If you’re feeling extra fancy (or extra sore!), dissolve some epsom salts into the hot water bath for added relief!

Yoga

Yoga, or even daily stretching, becomes a necessity for those of us on our feet all day, every day. There are particularly two yoga asanas, or postures, that can be of utmost benefit to relieving aches and pains in the feet while offering healing to the whole body.

The first posture is called viparita karani , also known as “legs-up-the-wall pose.” Find a comfortable, open place where you can bring your backside close to the wall, laying on your back. Then, extend your legs up the wall, keeping them elevated for 20-30 minutes. You can also put a blanket under your low back for added support. This posture helps to improve the lymphatic system of the body, which does not have its own means of circulation in the body. Thus, in order for us to improve our lymph systems, we have to invert the body for the lymph system can flow in the opposite direction with the help of gravity.

Another yoga posture that can be helpful to farmers and gardeners, alike, is called vajrasana , or lightning bolt pose, with toes tucked under. This posture is not for the faint of heart; however, powerful benefits can be felt throughout your feet, ankles, and knees. Kneel down on both knees, then sit back on top of your heels. Tuck your toes under and continue to sit back onto your heels for as long as you feel comfortable. You should feel an intense stretch throughout the foot with some warmth building. Just know relief is on it’s way!

Self-Massage

Take time for yourself each morning or night, and give yourself a simple treat with a foot massage. Use oil, such as sesame, jojoba, or even ghee, mixed with your favorite essential oil, to help deeply moisturize those toesies all dried out from the sun and dirt while offering yourself some much needed relaxation. If your hands are too tired to do the job, try a rolling a lacrosse or golf ball under your feet as you sit back and relax. You can also freeze a plastic water bottle and use this similarly to the lacrosse ball, rolling each foot back and forth on the frozen-solid bottle. The iced water bottle will also aid in reducing swelling and inflammation on your foot’s surface.

I know, taking care of yourself first is difficult for farmers. But, by giving yourself a little extra love and care, especially during the height of the season, you’ll find each day to be more and more productive, and you’ll soon come to see your work on yourself is as valuable, if not more, valuable than any work that you can do on the land!

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of



Oh, we are all about…




See the Light and Fight the Winter Blues

Often called the winter blues or seasonal depression, Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) can actually occur during any season. It is a more common affliction than most people realize and affects millions.

Causes

There is no exact cause known for the disorder. Yet, most experts agree that it is connected with changing seasons, shorter days, and lower light levels. Our natural circadian rhythm is also thrown out of whack whenever we don’t follow a normal day to night routine. This is quite common for people working the night shift and sleeping during daylight hours.

The amount of light we are exposed to every day has a direct effect on our body’s chemistry. A connection to the level of substances such as melatonin and serotonin has been found. Melatonin affects our sleep patterns and serotonin balances our moods. Patients suffering from SAD often have diminished amounts of both.

Risks

Seasonal Affective Disorder can affect anyone, but women seem to be more susceptible to it than men. The largest population age-wise that appears to be affected are mid-teens to late fifties. Studies have shown that the chances of people getting SAD for the first time goes down as they get older.

It has been found to run in families so if a close relative has SAD, it is likely that you might also experience it. It is also clear that the farther away from the equator a person lives, the higher their chances are of having SAD. They are exposed to even less sunlight than those in closer proximity to the sun’s rays.

Symptoms

Because having the winter blues is essentially a form of depression, many of the symptoms can be the same or similar. Those with bipolar disorder can also be affected adversely from SAD. Some of the symptoms can include:

  • Low energy, feeling sluggish
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Appetite and/or weight changes
  • Feelings of depression all day, every day
  • Sleeping difficulties
  • Easily becoming agitated
  • Craving and eating more carbohydrates
  • Loss of interest or joy in activities you once loved
  • Feeling hopeless, guilty, or worthless
  • Frequent suicidal thoughts or death fantasies

It is always a good idea to contact your doctor if you are having any types of the symptoms listed above. Medical professionals can do tests to rule out things such as thyroid issues or other health concerns. A mental health evaluation can be useful. It may help determine if it is just SAD that you are dealing with or something more serious.

Therapies

The most common therapy for treating SAD is getting more light into your life. Getting out into the sunshine is one of the top prescriptions for SAD. In areas that receive extraordinary amounts of rain and gray days, this may seem impossible – but it’s not. There are many products on the market that can mimic sunlight and help your body adjust.

Most doctors will prescribe light therapy or phototherapy. This is the practice of sitting in front of a special light box that emits a powerful fluorescent light. It is said to be more than 20 times brighter than normal light found indoors. Researchers claim that the extra light stimulates the body to produce more serotonin. This, in turn, elevates your mood. Lightbox therapy is usually an ongoing treatment and not something that is a quick fix.

There are several medications that may also be prescribed for this type of depression. They will vary with the type of symptoms you exhibit as well as with each individual doctor. Different drugs have a wide variety of side effects so be sure to do your research before beginning any new prescriptions.

Get Out and About

If you think there is a chance you might be suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder, talk to your doctor. In the meantime, you can do several things to help your body adjust to the shorter, darker days of winter.

Get outside as much as possible and seek that sunshine. Exercise and get the blood flowing even if it is just walking in your sleeping garden. Finally, try to get as much rest and sleep as your body needs. These simple things can improve your mood as well as your overall health and help you fight those winter blues.


Picked For You

  • 3 Surefire Ways to Safeguard Your Escrow Deposit3 Surefire Ways to Safeguard Your Escrow Deposit
    If you are buying a home for the first time, you might not be aware that you need to put down a deposit when you make your offer as a sign of your seriousness. While this good-faith gesture portrays your intention to purchase the home, it also comes with the risk that you can lose …