Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Does hand washing really kill germs and keep you healthy? You probably remember your mother saying, “Wash your hands.” Millions of mothers can’t be wrong! Hand washing is an easy, inexpensive way to stay healthy. It kills germs. It can increase your chances of warding off colds, the flu, respiratory infections, skin and eye infections, and infectious diarrhea.

How to wash.

Women who farm are always washing their hands. But like anything else, it has to be done correctly. To receive the full benefits of hand washing, remember to use soap and scrub every part of your hand. Be sure to include the palms and backs and wash thoroughly between your fingers and even under your fingernails. If working in a short-sleeved or sleeveless top, wash past your wrist too. Continue the washing for twenty seconds.

You pick up germs all day long from the farm, other people, surfaces you touch inside your home, pets, etc. So you have no choice but to make hand washing a habit throughout the day. This can become so routine that you think it is automatic and that you’re good to go. But all too often we skip washing when going to the bathroom, help a child use the bathroom, or even change a diaper. And what about after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose? Of course you wash your hands before eating as well as before and after you prepare food. But what about after disposing of any kind of garbage, tending to cuts and injuries or taking care of someone who is sick? These small things are not to be taken lightly. You are at the center of your family, the reason why they’re happy, healthy and thriving.

How to dry.

A study on hand-drying methods indicated there is no major difference in the effectiveness of one above the other. However, it is important that you dry your hands thoroughly. If they are damp after washing and drying, bacteria can still remain. If you are away from home and have to use an air dryer, do not rub your hands together. Doing so can bring bacteria in your pores up to the surface of the skin. If possible, fight against potential germs by using a paper towel to turn off the water faucet and open the door. It’s quite possible to pick up more germs on your way out of a public bathroom.

Sometimes you need to wash your hands, but you don’t have access to soap and water. Hand sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs, but they can certainly help. Use a hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol. Be sure to apply the it to every part of your hands, palms, back, fingers, and between fingers.

Whew! Now aren’t you glad you listened to your mother and washed your hands? Always remember that washing your hands correctly increases your chances of enjoying good health.

 

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of



Oh, we are all about…




Predator-Proofing Your Chicken Coop

Homesteading is a lot of fun and a lot of work. Aside from daily chores, homesteading also comes with the headaches of keeping your chickens alive and well. The biggest culprit? Predators. Chicken raising comes with its fair share of heartache, particularly if you have foxes, possums, and wildcats in your midst.

While there’s no such thing as being 100% predator-proof, you can take steps to protect your flock. Here are my favorite predator-proofing measures. Add yours in the comments!

No chicken wire

I know it’s called chicken wire, but it’s not the best option to protect your chickens. It’s designed to keep chickens in, but it doesn’t keep predators out. Opt for stronger hardware cloth instead. Use it anywhere you would normally use chicken wire, like the sides of the coop or windows.

Elevate

Digging animals are a huge threat to grounded coops. It can cost a little more, but elevating your coop is an easier way to dig-proof. If you’d like to keep your coop on the ground, bury hardware cloth two feet below the surface. Sure, it’s extra work, but it can be the difference between having chickens and having a lot of feathers. For extra dig-proofing, design your coop to have solid floors. It’s much harder to dig through wood than dirt!

Lock it up

Always bring your chickens inside the coop before nightfall. They should be locked up safely from sunset to sunrise every day to protect against predators. Remember to choose a complex lock for your coop, too. Raccoons are very cunning critters and have been known to open simple hatch-based locks.

Have guards

Hens aren’t known for their fighting skills. However, other farm animals can defend your ladies. Roosters are a bit of a handful, but if you can tolerate them, they will protect your chickens. In fact, roosters are known to herd the hens to a safe area and sacrifice themselves protecting the flock. If you don’t want the work of keeping a rooster, guard dogs can also keep your hens safe in the event of a predator invasion.

Motion activated lights

Nighttime predators despise light. To deter predators from pestering your hens, install bright LED motion-activated lights.

The bottom line

Homesteaders are no strangers to heartbreak. However, you should take every precaution possible to prevent tragedy from befalling your chickens. Use these tips to strengthen your hens’ home and protect against pesky predators.


Picked For You

  • The Way to an Asthma and Allergy Safe GardenThe Way to an Asthma and Allergy Safe Garden
    One of life’s simple pleasures is relaxing in a garden filled with beautiful plants. The ‘outdoor room’ is often the best room in the house, a retreat from the hassles of the working day. But what if you or someone in your home is an asthmatic or suffers from plant allergies? It might seem an …