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Birds as livestock guardians? Yes! And, they just might be the best critter for the job! We’ve talked about using llamas, donkeys, and dogs to guard our livestock, but did you know that some species of birds can make excellent guard animals, too? Birds could, in fact, be the perfect off-grid security solution for your homestead!

Using Geese for Homestead Security

If you want an animal that’s going to stay close to home and protect and defend your livestock and farm, consider a flock of guard geese. Believe it or not, geese have been used to protect police stations in China and to patrol prison yards in Brazil. Geese can be every bit as effective as a guard dog, and they do it on instinct. You don’t even have to train them.

All geese, but especially males, are extremely territorial. While most domestic geese retain their ability to fly, they choose not to. Once they know your farm is home, they will defend it from intruders, to the death if need be. Geese have even been successfully used as a defense against coyotes! Now that says something, doesn’t it?

Geese will bond with their owners and the other animals around them if they are brought to your farm as chicks. Anyone else, human or animal, is likely to be treated as an intruder and viciously attacked on sight. Their exceptional eyesight and hearing makes them perfect for detecting intruders both day and night. They also have a wide field of view, thanks to their widely spaced eyes.

Geese really know how to sound an alarm. Once they’ve noticed an intruder, there’s no stopping their honking until the threat is gone, and often for a good while afterwards, too! Geese are flock animals, so they are happiest in a group. That means intruders will face multiple defenders at once. Each goose comes armed with a sharp serrated beak that’s capable of inflicting some serious bites. But, that’s not all! Their wings are weapons, too. They are capable of beating their opponent so hard that they could actually break bones. And, certain breeds of domestic geese can weigh as much as 22 pounds! That’s a lot of power behind their punch.

If all that wasn’t enough, geese are easy to keep. Their food preference is to graze on grass. They are excellent foragers, so if there’s plenty of grass available, they won’t need much additional feed. Domestic geese don’t fly south for the winter, but prefer to stay at their home base. They don’t mind the cold and their downy feathers and webbed feet provide excellent insulation. Even better, they lay delicious eggs and they can live for up to 20 years. They make good moms and are quite capable of raising up their own young to expand the flock or fill the freezer.

The biggest con to having a flock of geese on the homestead is that they don’t know the difference between a hostile intruder and a friendly intruder. And, you’re not going to be able to call them off like you can a dog. They might attack the mailman or any other visitor that comes to your farm. You should be prepared to put them in some sort of pen when you’re expecting company, especially if the company includes small children!

Using Guinea Fowl for Homestead Security

Guineas are another multi-purpose bird that can be very useful on the homestead. A flock of guineas will work as a team, staying in a tight group as they forage around the farm looking for insects, small rodents, and snakes to eat. They have excellent hearing and eyesight and they’re always on the alert.

As a guardian animal, they attack in groups to chase off smaller poultry-eating predators including cats, opossums, and even raccoons. Your farm cats will learn really quick to stay clear of the guineas! Guineas have a natural hatred of snakes. They are fearless, and they’ve been used by ranchers to keep dangerous snakes like copperheads and rattlers away from the flocks. If you have problems with snakes eating your chicken eggs, keep some guineas around and you won’t have problems anymore! Groups of guineas will surround a snake, or other small predator, and literally peck it to death.

Guineas are also commonly used by the homesteader as an alarm animal. A flock of guineas that has spotted an intruder, human or animal, can be deafening. Over time, you learn to tell the difference between their normal noise and their alarm noise. You know that when they are raising an alarm you better go out and see what’s going on! They will alert you to the presence of all sorts of predators, including coyotes and stray dogs, and pretty much anything else that doesn’t belong.

Guineas are useful as pest control, too. If you have problems with ticks in your area, a flock of guineas will gobble them up pretty quick and keep them under control. In the garden, guineas can be used to patrol the crops for pests. They won’t do nearly as much damage to your plants as chickens will, and they will keep the bugs well under control. Just wait until your plants are pretty large before giving the guineas access to the garden because they may dig up seedlings in freshly worked soil.

Guinea hens lay delicious eggs, but only in the spring and early summer. Their eggs are a little smaller than chicken eggs and they are light brown in color. If you keep your guineas confined until they are done laying in the morning, it will be much easier to find the eggs. However, they will forage most of their food if allowed, so they’re very cheap to keep around.

Guineas do have some less endearing qualities you should be aware of, though. For one, guineas like to converse a lot, so they are noisy all the time, not just when they are sounding an alarm. If you have close neighbors, that could be an issue. Also, guineas don’t like to be confined. They will wander into neighbors’ yards looking for food and they prefer to roost in the trees at night if they can get away with it. They do, however, love millet and can be trained to come to their house at night for a treat, especially if you start when they’re keets. Also, guineas are not very smart, and they are vulnerable to larger predators like coyotes and foxes. Guineas are horrible mothers, so you’re better off incubating the eggs and brooding the keets yourself, or you could let a broody hen do it.

Conclusion

I’m a big believer in multiple layers of protection on the homestead. Having geese or guineas around as an alarm system and for protection against smaller predators makes good sense. Add in a larger guardian animal for protection against big predators and the best fencing you can afford, and you’ll have a very effective off-grid homestead security system.

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Oh, we are all about…




The Nutritional Value Of Honey

Honey is the delicious, all natural sweetener that homesteaders can’t resist. But what’s the difference between honey and, say, sugar from the store? Is honey really healthier than regular sugar? Learn about the nutritional value of honey–both the good and the bad.

The bad news

It’s easier to start with the bad news, isn’t it?

The downside to honey is that, yes, it’s packed full of sugar and calories. It’s a sweetener, after all! One cup of honey can contain over 1,000 calories; that gives you about 65 calories per tablespoon. Since honey is a sweetener, it does increase blood sugar levels, albeit not as much as standard sugar.

The other downside is that not all honey is created equally. The honey on sale at your grocery store probably isn’t as good as honey harvested from your own bees, for example. The quality of the honey will determine how healthy or unhealthy it is for your body.

The good news

Never fear: we have lots of good news about honey!

Honey is naturally high in fructose, which means it tastes sweeter than sugar from the store. That’s great news, because it means you can use less honey to get the same desired level of sweetness.

Quality honey is healthier than other sweeteners because it contains plant compounds and antioxidants. If you’re looking for antioxidant-packed honey, you can usually tell by color. Go for darker honey to get more nutrition.

The antioxidants in honey may play a role in cancer prevention and even eye health. Honey also raises HDL (good) cholesterol and lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol, making it a heart-healthy alternative to other sweeteners.

But you don’t have to eat honey to see its benefits. You can even use honey to treat cuts and lesions; many studies found topically-applied honey speeds up the healing process.

The bottom line

Honey is an amazing addition to your homestead. Although it should be considered a treat since it’s still a sweetening agent, swapping sugar with honey can improve your health. Consider switching to honey for a more nutritious, natural alternative.


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