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When your does are getting close to kidding time, you will probably start to feel a bit like an expectant mother yourself! I know I do! Preparing a kidding kit and birthing stall helps me to feel more prepared and capable. I will admit, I rarely need to do much. Most of the time, Momma is just fine on her own. But, for those times when you need to intervene, you will be so grateful you are prepared.

Here’s What is in My Kidding Kit:

This list probably seems extensive, but you will probably already have most of these items on hand already.

  • Paper Towels: Just like childbirth, kidding is a messy business. You will be glad to have paper towels around for a multitude of reasons.
  • Puppy Housebreaking Pads: Hopefully, your kids will be born in a nice clean stall filled with straw. Even so, it will be nice to have them land on a puppy pad to keep the stall and the kids a little cleaner. If you don’t have any on hand, old towels will work just as well.
  • Old Towels: If it’s cold, or momma isn’t up to it, you’ll want towels for drying off the kids.
  • Betadine: Betadine is my go to antiseptic here on the farm. Use it to disinfect any tools you use during the birth, and to clean your hands in the event you need to help during the birth. I also use it for dipping the cord stump of the kids after birth.
  • Small Paper or Plastic Cups: For putting the betadine in to dip the cords.
  • Sterile Gloves and Lube: Just in case you need to assist.
  • A Headlamp: Momma’s never go into labor when it’s convenient. It shouldn’t be any surprise that they usually do it in the middle of the night. If this happens to you, you will be glad to have a headlamp that will allow you to see and still leave your hands free.
  • Hemostats: I don’t always need to clamp the cord, but when I do I use a hemostat to clamp it.
  • Scissors: For cutting the cord, if I need to.
  • A Bottle, Nipple, and Kid Colostrum Replacement: I have these on hand in case something goes wrong during the birth. Thankfully, I’ve never needed them, but it’s best to be prepared.
  • Feeding Tube and Syringe: If you have a kid that’s too weak to eat, you can use a feeding tube with colostrum from mom or a replacement.
  • Black Strap Molasses and Warm Water: This is for momma after the birth to give her a little pick-me-up after all her hard work. I also give her a ration of grain.
  • Heat lamp and Baby Goat Sweaters: If it’s very cold outside, you’ll need to keep those babies warm. Please use extreme caution if you need a heat lamp. They can be a dangerous fire hazard. The only time I use one is if it’s below freezing. Otherwise, momma and baby goat sweater should be enough for the job.
  • Garbage Bags: For obvious reasons.
  • Warm Soapy Water: Nice to have on hand for washing up your hands or the kids’ faces.
  • Your Veterinarian’s Phone Number: Don’t hesitate to call in your vet at the first sign of trouble. Have a back-up number on hand too, either a second vet or someone you call on the phone that has a lot of kidding experience and can talk you through an emergency.
  • Selenium Gel: If you live in a selenium deficient area, you will want to give this to the kids. Talk to your vet about it ahead of time.
  • A Digital Thermometer: One of the first things the vet is going to ask if you call with a problem is whether or not the goat has a fever. Normal temp for a goat is 101.5-103.5.
  • A Leg Snare and A Kid Puller: Spend some time studying up on how to use these and have them on hand if you need them.
How to Prepare a Kidding Stall:

Having a private place for kidding helps to keep momma calm and keep everything cleaner during the process. It’s easy to set up a birthing area and it’s well worth doing. I usually have mine ready to go at least a week before kidding is expected. If you don’t have a separate stall in your barn you can use for kidding, you can make one with cattle panels and some zip ties. You’ll want I nice, thick layer of clean bedding on the floor. Momma will also want hay, fresh water, and grain, so be prepared to offer those. I also like to set up a baby monitor between the barn and the house, so I can hear what’s going on out there. Have your camera ready to go, too!

Signs of Early Labor

To be honest, my does will sometimes go into labor without me ever noticing any signs, so don’t feel bad if you don’t see it coming. Here’s what you should be watching for:

  • A full, tight udder- When her udder is so tight that it almost looks shiny, it’s likely she will go into labor within 24 hours.
  • Behavior changes- Does will usually want to stay in the barn when they are close. You might also notice “nesting” behavior. She might paw at her bedding or stand up and lay down a lot. I’ve even seen my does talk to their belly. Also, if she’s standing alone in the corner with her head against the wall, she’s very close, or already in active labor.
  • Loss of the tail ligaments- There are two ligaments that run along where the tail and spine meet. Normally, they feel like two pencils. Before labor, they will get so soft that you almost won’t be able to feel them anymore.
  • Discharge- You will notice an increase in vaginal discharge as she gets closer to the big day, but it will be especially heavy when she gets close to starting labor.
  • Swollen vulva- When the kids start to drop into the birth canal, they put pressure on the doe’s rear end and you will notice that her vulva is swollen. When you see this, you’ll want to keep a close eye for other signs. This usually means labor is 1-3 days away.

With a little advanced preparation, you will be much calmer when kidding time rolls around. And, if anything goes wrong, you’ll be much better equipped to handle any emergency.

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Oh, we are all about…




Natural Renaissance

Many African-American women are forgoing the hair relaxer and returning to their hair’s natural texture. Why?

To understand this, one must first understand what a hair relaxer is and what it does. It is a chemical that is applied to the hair, left on a set amount of time, then rinsed out, all in order to straighten naturally kinky hair. The straightening components are either sodium hydroxide or calcium hydroxide (thus the “lye” versus “no-lye” distinction). This is a permanent process that must be reapplied to the hair’s new growth as it comes in to keep a straight, uniform look.

Although proclaimed as a safe procedure, there are risks involved, especially if the relaxer is left on the hair too long or comes in contact with the skin. Women have been left with scarring from chemical burns when the relaxer was improperly used. There have been cases where the hair follicles were damaged beyond repair; consequently, these areas no longer will grow hair.

But it’s not only damage that is making many black women forego straightening their hair. The reasons are as varied as the women themselves.

Since many women have had their hair straightened from a young age, they may have no recollection what their natural hair looks like. They might be curious to rediscover their roots. Some women grow tired of the constant maintenance required of relaxed hair. On average, the process needs to be applied to the new growth every four to eight weeks. Factor in the time it takes to set relaxed hair on rollers or to blow dry and style and it can be quite time-consuming to keep up.

Still other women are embracing their natural heritage and a natural lifestyle. One of the surest ways to differentiate themselves from others is by wearing their natural hair proudly. Only tightly curled or kinky hair can stand up and out in an Afro.

In the 1960’s and 1970’s, many blacks wore their natural hair in Afros, in part as a spurning of the subjugated way of life they and their ancestors were forced to live. It was a time of racial pride and upheaval. Once the Civil Rights Movement came to an end, many black people who wanted to join corporate America found they had to “assimilate.” To blend in with the powers that be, it was necessary to conform. For women, this most often meant straightening the hair. For men, it was a low haircut.

In the early to mid-1990’s, as black music evolved to include a Neo-soul sound, reminiscent of the ‘60’s and ‘70’s, black style changed as well. Hair began to take a turn back. Braids and dreadlocks (or “locs” as most loc wearers prefer them to be called) became popular. Natural black hair began to be celebrated again.

At the start of a new millennium, more and more women are returning to their natural texture. Unlike the earlier wave of naturals, there are many more options for styling, instead of just the basic Afro. There are books and websites dedicated to the care of black hair, which are needed since so many women didn’t grow up caring for their hair in its natural state and don’t have a clue how to care for it.

Perhaps this renaissance will continue and natural hair will become the accepted norm. One day, maybe naturally textured black women will be the majority and few will remember a time when harsh chemicals were freely applied to kinky hair to change it into something it wasn’t meant to be.


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