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If you’ve ever felt the rush of fulfillment when you cook using your own vegetables, wait till you try garnishing your meals with home-grown herbs.

Herbs are a great way to add flavor and an appetizing aroma to your meals but the high price of them on the market makes them seem like they’re not really a necessity. Luckily, with a little effort, you can start growing herbs on your own.

Since herbs are fairly small, it’ll be better to start growing them out of pots so you can manage them easily. Fertilizer is important for when you’re growing them and it can help retain nutritional balance in your soil which can grow healthy herbs.

To know if your soil is lacking any essential minerals, you can collect samples and have it tested. The test will determine what nutrients it contains, and what it doesn’t so you can get the right fertilizer. Remember to use an organic fertilizer that won’t cause any damage to your plants’ or your health.

Once you’ve prepped your soil, you’re ready to put it into pots and begin growing, but you need to pick which herbs you want to grow.

Two factors will determine what herbs you should grow; how easy it is to grow a certain herb and what your personal preferences are. (Of course, you’ll want to grow herbs that you actually intend to use.) For convenience, I’ll be naming herbs that you can find in almost every kitchen.

Parsley

You can grow this versatile herb by sowing them in warm soil. The soil can be either in a pot on a window or in a bed when the soil feels warm. These seeds can take some time to finally germinate so you can speed it up a notch by putting them in water and leaving them overnight before you plant them. Grow them in damp soil and place the pot in a sunny place.

Rosemary

This is the ultimate beginner’s herb because of how simple it is to grow, not to mention how good it tastes. Since it grows with hard leaves, it doesn’t lose water too quickly, which means you shouldn’t keep the soil too moist either.

Other than that, the soil doesn’t need much prepping and you don’t need to make special arrangements with regards to sun or shade, because rosemary isn’t picky.

Oregano

If cooking Italian is your specialty, then you need an Oregano plant right away. This delicious herb prefers light and warm soil, as well as lots of sunshine.

Sow them in a pot with warm soil, and pinch out the parts which grow vertically when the shoot has a height of 10 centimeters because it helps in stimulating growth.

Coriander

This herb is fairly popular in Asian cuisine and now you can grow it at home in pots. The seeds will take a few weeks until they germinate while the plants don’t last very long, so you’ll need to add more seeds often so you have a consistent supply. If you want the best-tasting coriander, then keep your plants healthy and harvest it often.

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Pleasant Permaculture For Your Homestead

Homesteading isn’t just about taming nature. It’s about working with Mother Nature to create the most effective and eco-friendly solutions. That’s why all homesteaders should give permaculture a go, no matter the size of their homestead.

Permaculture basics

“What the heck is permaculture?”

That was the first thing out of my mouth when my husband suggested permaculture for our yard. We live in the city, but we’ve always been fans of urban homesteading hacks. And, as it turns out, permaculture is the answer for smart farming on small plots of land.

Permaculture is an agricultural practice that encourages diversity and harmony in your garden. It’s based on standards for eco-conscious design that also help us humans improve land use and crop yield.

For example, you wouldn’t find neat, single-file rows in permaculture. Instead, permaculture guides gardeners to use the natural symbiotic relationships we find with plants in the wild. This helps humans harvest in the most sustainable way possible while ensuring plant and soil health.

Permaculture and homesteading

That sounds great, but what does it mean to actually practice permaculture?

Zero waste
Nothing goes to waste in permaculture. This takes the form of fertilizing with livestock waste, composting, or using cover crops to provide nutrients into the soil. The goal is to turn any waste back into a resource for your crops.

Perennial planting
It’s a pain to plant seeds every year. Save yourself time and hassle while protecting the quality of your soil by opting for perennial plans. These will grow back year after year, providing a constant source of food with little upkeep.

Natural pest control
Pest control is a must for any homesteader. If you don’t want to spritz your trees with chemicals, use permaculture pairings to naturally ward off unwanted visitors. For example, you can plant understory plants, like beans or herbs, underneath your trees. These companion plantings make the most of your available growing space while keeping the bugs at bay.

Got chickens? Let them cluck around the garden. I guarantee your aphid problems will be a thing of the past.

The bottom line

Humans have been practicing permaculture for thousands of years. Think outside the garden rows and give it a try! You’ll reduce waste, maximize production, and improve your garden’s health.


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