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We get it. In this day, working outside the home is part of our lives. Even a farmer might find that keeping a job can help make their farm more productive or make ends meet. But it comes with a price, as parts of our modern lifestyle do not add to happiness, possibly making you unhappy. Here are six such issues, and what you can do to counteract them.

You don’t spend enough time in nature

Studies have shown that natural environments, including parks and the beach, are beneficial to well-being. People who spend time in nature feel happier and more relaxed, and experience less mental fatigue. Comparatively, urban environments make people feel stressed and mentally tired. Fix: Take some time regularly to get outdoors.

You don’t get enough daylight

Depending on your job and location, you may only get a small amount of natural light per day. Some office workers set off for work in the dark, spend all day indoors, and then go home in the dark. This routine can cause low vitamin D levels, and if you suffer from seasonal affective disorder (SAD), it can have an adverse effect on your mood. The solution is simple: spend more time outdoors in direct sunlight.

Material possessions have taken over

Everyone has experienced retail therapy, that high you get when you spend money on something new. But that new prized possession quickly becomes passe, and soon, you’re pining after something else. To counter this, get into the habit of spending money on experiences, not possessions.

You’re addicted to your smartphone

The research base is still in its early stages, but the evidence is building that excessive social media usage contributes to low moods and anxiety. Try this experiment — keep your phone and internet off for one day, and count how many times you feel the urge to check your smartphone. You may be surprised at the results. To help curb your technology addiction, spend some time every day unplugged, with the WiFi, and all phones turned off.

Your commute is making you miserable

Commuting to work has been rated in surveys as the least happy time of day, even lower than being at work. In the search for a more comfortable life, many people accept jobs far away from their home. But long commute times may negate the monetary benefits. In reality, the shorter your commute, the happier you’ll be. Finding work closer to home is the best case scenario but if you can’t, is it possible to negotiate a few days per week where you work from home?

You’ve Stopped Connecting

The link between social relationships and happiness is well-established by research. Unfortunately though, as people older, they spend less and less time with their friends. It’s so easy to let friendships slide, especially if you’re tired after work, have children, or have a date with a box set. However, it is important to find ways to make it work. Invite friends over, plan an evening out, or just show up unannounced one day. Netflix can wait.

Make the effort

Human beings are creatures of habit, and it’s easy to get stuck doing the same things every day, even if they are not beneficial. It can take a bit of effort to adjust your routine, but the benefits are worth it. Try applying the above solutions just for one month, and see what effect it has on your life.

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Milking Basics for Beginners

So, you’ve finally purchased that milk cow or goat you’ve been dreaming about! She’s been bred and the big day is fast approaching. Once the calf or kids are born, it will be time to get started with milking. Milking takes a little practice and patience to learn, but it can be one of the most enjoyable chores on the homestead.

Equipment

A stanchion is best for milking cows and a milking stand with a stanchion is best for milking goats. Some animals also doing fine just being tied. You will have to work with your animal to see what works best for both of you. You should have a comfortable stool to sit on while you’re milking. An adjustable one is nice so that you can get it to just the right height for you and your animal. You will also need a stainless-steel bucket to milk into. One with a lid or some other way to cover it is best to prevent debris from getting into your milk.

The Best Place for Milking

The best place to do your milking is in an outbuilding, such as a barn or shed. The area should be clean, dry and out of the wind. Set up your stanchion or milking stand in an area that is quiet and out of the way. You want your girl to be calm and content while you’re milking. If something scares her, the milk may stop flowing, at least for a minute or two.

Scheduling Your Milking

You have two options when it comes to scheduling your milking. You could milk your girl every 12 hours and feed her calves or kids their share with a bottle until they’re old enough to drink from a bucket. Or, you could separate momma and babies all night, milk in the morning, and then let them run together in the pasture all day.

Preparing to Milk

Every experienced milker is going to have their own routine that varies a little bit, but this is what I do. My girls are usually eager to be milked, so I call them to me and reward them with a little treat when they come. They are put into the stanchion and given a quick all-over brushing to remove loose hair and dirt. Cleanliness is crucial, so my hands are washed and dried with warm water brought from the house. Then, my girl’s teats and udder are also washed thoroughly and dried, giving the udder a good massage while doing so. Washing with warm water is not only important for cleanliness, it also stimulates let-down of the milk. While you’re up close and personal, check the teats and udder for any sign of sores or lumps that might make milking uncomfortable for her. We will go into what to do if there’s a problem in just a moment.

After the grooming and washing are complete, they get their grain. This keeps them occupied while I’m milking and they are generally much more cooperative. Your goal is to have a happy and relaxed animal while you’re milking, so send any distractions away and keep the area calm and quiet.

The Main Event

Now, it’s time to work quickly. Let down doesn’t last forever, and you want to be done by the time your girl finishes her grain.

Grab high on the teat, right near the udder, with your thumb and forefinger. Now, gently constrict the top of the teat to force the milk toward the end of the teat where the hole is. With your remaining fingers, squeeze gently to force the milk down and out, aiming for your bucket. The first 2-3 squirts from each nipple should be discarded. I usually just squirt them onto the ground.

A cow has four teats while a goat only has two. Work methodically from teat to teat. It’s important to empty each teat completely.
When the teats get a sort of wrinkled, shriveled appearance, it’s time to change up your technique and strip the last remaining milk from the teats. Using your thumb and forefinger, once again grip the teat at the udder. Pull the thumb and forefinger straight down the nipple, forcing out the last remaining milk from the teat. Repeat 5 or 6 times and go from teat to teat, letting each one rest for a moment and then coming back to it, making sure they are completely emptied. Not emptying her completely can lead to reduced milk supply and possibly even mastitis.

I like to finish up with another quick washing, followed by a teat dip to make sure there’s no bacteria left behind to cause problems.

FAQ’s: Milking Problems

Can I change my milking schedule?

Yes, but don’t do it abruptly. If you need to change your milking schedule, do it slowly by moving milking time forward or back 15 minutes every day or two until you get to the new time you desire. Remember to keep it at 12-hour intervals.

My cow/goat is very skittish and/or reluctant to be milked. What can I do?

First of all, be patient. If you’re upset, she’s going to be upset. Spend extra time with the grooming, ply her with love and treats, and then take extra time washing and massaging her udder. With time, most animals will come around, but it does take a lot of time and patience.

My goat’s teats are very small, making it hard to milk her. Is there a better way?

Goat’s with very small teats can be a challenge to milk with your full hand. Try using the stripping technique described above for the entire milking process. It will take longer, but you should be able to get the job done.

My cow/goat has a cut or sore on her udder or teat. How should I treat it?

Keep the area clean and dry, but don’t discontinue milking or she’ll suffer from the extra milk built up in her udder. No matter how much the cut or sore hurts, she will suffer a lot more from an over full udder. Bag balm is great for soothing chapped skin, cuts, or sores.

How do I know if my goat/cow has mastitis, and what should I do?

First of all, do not drink the milk if you suspect your animal has mastitis because it is full of infection. Mastitis is caused by bacteria that have entered the whole in the teat or a cut in the udder. The infected area will feel warm, be tender to the touch, with milk that is thick, lumpy, or possibly has blood in it. Sometimes you will feel lumps in the udder itself. In many cases, it will be obvious that attempting to milk her is causing pain.

If you suspect mastitis, immediate treatment with antibiotics is a must. Call the vet for dosage and type. It’s important to act very quickly to improve chances of success. Also, be aware that mastitis can spread from animal to animal, so wash your hands and equipment thoroughly between each animal.

Milking time is my favorite part of the day. You will see that you form a strong bond with your dairy animals, thanks to the close, personal contact every day. It does take some practice, but once you get into the routine of it, it becomes second nature!


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