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How do you ever get away? It’s one of the first things I hear when people come to visit our homestead. And, to be honest, I get a lot of complaining from my extended family when we can’t just drop everything to head to Florida for some family event or holiday.

To be honest, I don’t really mind. I a homebody, and I would rather be here on the homestead taking care of things. But, I also have a teenage daughter and a husband who would wring my neck if we didn’t get away once in a while. So, we do manage to take at least one family vacation every year, along with some weekend trips here and there. How do we do it? Well, there’s a lot of careful planning involved.

Here are my top tips to help you make a plan to get away from your homestead this year.

Choose the Time of Year for Your Vacation Carefully

This is one of the most important considerations. We rarely go anywhere during the summer months because the garden needs constant attention when it’s hot or you’ll lose everything.

We also have the goats to consider. I don’t like to travel when we’re milking because that’s a lot of responsibility for our farm sitter.

We can usually plan on getting away in late fall after the girls are bred. Winter and early spring are doable for us, too, as long as it’s not too close to kidding time.

Select Your Farm Sitter Carefully

The other important consideration is finding a farm sitter. This will probably be the most difficult part of your planning process. I have a neighbor who checks on things every evening when we’re away, and if we’re going to be gone for more than a couple days, I also have a girl who comes by in the morning, too.

It makes me feel better to have two different people lined up. That way I know if something happens and one of them can’t get here, the other one will.

I always have everything set up so that all they have to do is give everyone a quick look over and check their food and water. Whoever wants to collect the eggs gets to keep them.

Travel Independently

Another option is to travel separately from your spouse. Although this isn’t my first choice, it’s what we often do for visits to extended family. My husband usually plans a visit with his family in early fall when things are slow for him. I go to Florida to visit my family in the winter, which works out great for getting a break from the cold. My daughter goes with each of us when we visit family, so we don’t get too much complaining about this arrangement.

Keep the Chore List as Short as Possible When You’re Gone

This is where the planning comes in. I try to have everything set up so that our farm sitter can be in and out of here in under 15 minutes. That means I do everything I can before we leave.

All the animal enclosures get a thorough cleaning and fresh bedding. Here’s what we do for each type of animal we have on our homestead to keep the chore list to a minimum.

  • Dogs: Dogs are a lot of responsibility, especially if they stay in the house. We like to take our dogs with us when we can get away with it. When we can’t, they go to a kennel we love here in town.
  • Cats: The cats are probably the easiest to prepare. I have a large feeder and waterer for when we go away, and I put out a couple extra litter boxes. I usually just have someone come in a couple times while we’re gone to clean the litter and their good to go.
  • Chickens: The chickens are pretty easy, too. Their feeder is big enough to hold about 7 days worth of food, and I put out two hanging waterers that will usually have to be refilled once while I’m gone. I make sure they can be reached with the hose to keep things simple. The chicken coop has a small, very secure run and that’s all they have access to when we’re gone, so they don’t have to be locked up at night. They are always happy to get out in their big yard when we get home, but they do fine.
  • Rabbits: The rabbits are a little more involved. What I generally do is wheel their whole rabbit tractor into the shed. Our farm sitters fill the waters and hay feeders as needed and give them their appropriate amounts of grain, morning and night.
  • Goats: The goats are a little more involved as well, but not as much as you might think. I leave them in their stalls when we’re away. Our farm sitters fill their hay racks and change their water as needed. We leave specific instructions about their grain and have it all set up so that the sitters don’t even have to open the stall doors to put the grain in. The girls are usually really happy to get out in the pasture when we get home, but since we only travel during the cooler months, they do fine in their stalls.

We don’t currently have any large livestock but when we have in the past, they usually have stayed in their stalls like the goats, or they could stay out in the pasture, as long as they can get out of the rain. Your farm sitter could fill the hay racks and fill the waters as needed.

If you have a milk cow, my best suggestion would be to time your vacation for when the calf can do the milking (this would work for goats, too). Leave mom and baby together while you’re away and you won’t have to find someone to milk for you, and there are no worries about mastitis.

I’m not going to lie. Leaving the homestead, even overnight, is pretty stressful for me. But, we manage to do it every year, and so can you. And think how sweet it will be to come home to all those warm greetings!

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DIY Wasp Trap

Wasps are heavily debated upon when it comes to farming. They were once considered a menace in the garden but many farmers have come to terms with them for being predators that hunt harmful pests. However, that doesn’t mean that they’re completely harmless; going out into your yard will be troublesome if there are wasps around, you can’t take a few steps without posing as a threat and getting stung. That’s why I leave the pest control to organic methods and decided to make a DIY wasp trap that can help me get rid of them.

You can insert these traps into the ground or hang them from a tree, but it’s most effective if you use them both, especially if your area is prone to wasps.

A Ground Soda Bottle Trap

Take an empty soda bottle which has a two-liter capacity but makes sure that is evenly wide along its sides. Use a sharpened knife to remove the top part of the bottle. This should be where the top part and remaining bottle share the same width.

Fill the bottom part with fruity and sweet bait and adjust the top part into the bottom by placing it upside down. For bait, you can use jam, fruit juice, or even soda itself. Make sure that the top fits within the bottom snugly but if they’re moving, tape them together so you have a fixed trap.

Set up your trap where you’ve spotted the most wasps, near you flowers or fruit crops. By smelling the bait, wasps will just crawl in through the hole to reach it. Once they’re inside, they’ll have trouble getting out. Eventually, they’ll drown in the soda or juice bait.

A Soda Bottle Trap to Hang

If you can observe wasps around your trees, then it’s best to hang a trap near them to keep them from stinging you while you’re pruning trees. You’ll need the same kind of bottle as the ground trap, but you’ll need two of them this time. Take one bottle and repeat what you did for the first trap by cutting off the top at the part where it shares a similar width as the remaining bottle.

Tighten the top of the other bottle and just as you cut off the top in the first trap, you’ll have to cut off the bottom where it’s just as wide as the rest of the bottle. Then make two tiny holes along the top from where you’ll pass out the string to hang your trap. Add some tape where the string runs from so that wasps don’t crawl out through the holes.

Place the smaller top part of the bottle inside the bigger one so both the tops are parallel. Ensure that it’s nice and tight, otherwise, use some tape so it doesn’t fall. Fill your trap with a 2-inch deep layer of bait before hanging it up on a branch.

Remember to clean out your trap every night since wasps won’t really feel like climbing into them if the juice has spoiled or is filled with their drowned comrades. To make sure that no wasps fly out to bite you while you’re cleaning and refilling, place the trap in a bucket full of water for thirty minutes before cleaning it out. Happy Farming!


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